Early HIV Test (£95) London

Early HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Test
(Detects 10 days after event)
in Wimbledon, London

Affordable early HIV test in London

There is an Admin Fee added to the price above:

Appointment Price Duration of Appointment
Pay the above one-off admin fee + pay for each blood test you want (this is the charge by the laboratory to analyse your blood).
*= £5 Surcharge for Weekend appointment
Blood Testing Service by Doctor One-off
£35* admin fee
10 minutes

To See Our Main Blood testing section for this, please visit Sexual Health Blood Testing page.

HIV/ HBV/ HCV (Early Detection Screen) [£95]

This is an early detection screen on blood for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C after 10 days of exposure to the viruses. This can occur either sexually or via infected needles.

HIV 1&2 RNA–this detects an active HIV infection in your blood.
HBV DNA– this detects an active Hepatitis B infection in your blood.
HCV RNA– this detects an active Hepatitis C infection in your blood.

Hepatitis B profile [£65]

This is requested by your doctor if you have acute hepatitis symptoms (see Hepatitis [acute] screen) or are incidentally found to have abnormal liver function tests. The Hepatitis B virus is contracted via exposure to blood or bodily fluids containing blood. Examples include sexual contact, blood transfusions, re-use of contaminated needles or vertical transmission from mother to child.

There are various Hepatitis B virus tests that are done to assess whether you have an acute (new) or chronic (for many months/ years) Hepatitis B virus infection. It also helps to detect a past Hepatitis B infection which has now cleared or just to see if your vaccination has been successful (see Hepatitis B Immunity [HBsAb]). It can take about 2-3 months to become positive after an exposure.

Explanation of Hepatitis B markers:

HBsAg (surface antigen)– Used to screen/ detect for a Hepatitis B virus infection. It is the first indication of an acute infection being present. It is also positive in people with chronic infections.

HBsAb (surface antibody)– Indicates a previous exposure to the Hepatitis B virus, but the virus is no longer present and cannot be passed on. It also protects against any future infection by the Hepatitis B virus. These antibodies are also acquired via vaccination.

HBcAb [IgG/IgM] (anti-core antibodies)– Used to detect an acute (IgM) and chronic (IgG) Hepatitis B virus infection. It usually persists for life. It is also used to detect for a past infection but you are now immune, in combination with HBsAb.

HBeAg– The ‘e’ antigen is only found in the blood when the Hepatitis B virus is actively replicating. This is used as a marker to see how infectious the person is (that is how quickly the person can spread it to another person).

HBeAb– present in those who have recovered from a recent Hepatitis B infection. HBcAb and HBsAb will also be present.

Here are some common scenarios:

Acute infection and contagious– Positive HBsAg and HBeAg; Positive or negative HBcAb; negative HBsAb and HBeAb.

Chronic infection but low risk of liver damage (carrier state)– positive HBsAg, HBcAb (IgG) and HBeAb; negative HBsAb, HBcAb (IgM) and HBeAg.

Active chronic infection and liver damage possible– positive HBsAg, HBcAb (IgG) and HBeAg; negative HBsAb, HBcAb (IgM) and HBeAb.

No active/ past infection and not immune, so can have Hepatitis B vaccination– negative HBsAg, HBsAb and HBcAb

Acute infection, now resolving– negative HBsAg, HBsAb and HBeAg; positive HBcAb and HBeAb.

Infection resolved, immunity due to natural infection– negative HBsAg, HBcAb (IgM) and HBeAg; positive HBsAb, HBcAb (IgG) and HBeAb.

Immunity due to vaccination– negative HBsAg and HBcAb; positive HBsAb.

If a chronic Hepatitis B virus is confirmed, your doctor will refer you on to the gastroenterologist / liver specialist for further testing +/- a liver biopsy.

Hepatitis C antigen [£27]

This is requested by your doctor if you have acute hepatitis symptoms (see Hepatitis [acute] screen) or are incidentally found to have abnormal liver function tests. The Hepatitis C virus is contracted via exposure to blood or bodily fluids containing blood. Examples are sexual contact, blood transfusions, re-use of contaminated needles or vertical transmission from mother to child. Hepatitis C is a common cause of chronic liver disease. 70% of those infected will develop chronic hepatitis and 25% of those will go on to develop cirrhosis of the liver. There is also an increased risk of developing Hepatocellular carcinoma.

The Hepatitis C antigen is a rapid non-specific test to assess for the presence of an acute Hepatitis C infection. It can take about 2 months to become positive after exposure.

If a Hepatitis C virus is suspected, your doctor will refer you on to the gastroenterologist/ liver specialist for further testing +/- a liver biopsy.

Hepatitis C antibodies [£27]

This is requested by your doctor if you have acute hepatitis symptoms (see Hepatitis [acute] screen) or are incidentally found to have abnormal liver function tests. The Hepatitis C virus is contracted via exposure to blood or bodily fluids containing blood. Examples are sexual contact, blood transfusions, re-use of contaminated needles or vertical transmission from mother to child. Hepatitis C is a common cause of chronic liver disease. 70% of those infected will develop chronic hepatitis and 25% of those will go on to develop cirrhosis of the liver. There is also an increased risk of developing Hepatocellular carcinoma.

The Hepatitis C antibody is a non-specific test to assess for the presence of an acute Hepatitis C infection. It cannot tell you if you have had a previous infection or have a current infection. It can take about 2 months to become positive after exposure.

If a Hepatitis C virus is suspected, your doctor will refer you on to the gastroenterologist/ liver specialist for further testing +/- a liver biopsy.

HIV 1&2/p24Ag [£23]

This test is done to detect HIV. It may not detect HIV immediately after exposure (sexual or needlestick injury) and can take between 10 days and 3 months to become positive. Hence, if checking, you are asked to repeat the HIV test again at least 3 months after exposure.
The p24 antigen test can become positive earlier than the HIV antibody test if exposure to the infection is recent.

This combination HIV/p24Ag becomes positive 1 month after exposure to HIV. If your exposure is over 10 days ago only, please do the Early Detection Screen above.

Syphilis [£24]

This is used to diagnose an infection with syphilis. Syphilis may present with a chancre (ulcer on your genitals or throat) or a non-itchy rash on your trunk and extremities.

The syphilis antibodies indicate that you have a current (IgM) or past (IgG) infection. It may take up to 3 months after exposure to become positive. The antibodies can also remain positive many years after being treated for a previous syphilis infection.

Positive tests do not necessarily mean that you have syphilis. Further, more specific testing may be necessary.
If you are positive for Syphilis, it would be best to get a comprehensive STD (sexually transmitted disease) check from your local GUM clinic as many other STD’s can co-exist.